The Way of Rome?

Historians and Scholars, to this day, still debate and argue over what actually caused the Roman Empire to fall. A once thriving, productive and relatively peaceful Empire was eventually diminished by depravity, corruption and endless war. When the Barbarians invaded and gradually became supreme in the land, the Roman Empire was already in its final stages of decay. The fall was inevitable with or without the Barbarian invasion. As the classic historian, Edward Gibbons, wrote in his 1776 masterpiece, “If all the barbarian conquerors had been annihilated in the same hour, their total destruction would not have restored the empire of the West: and if Rome still survived, she survived the loss of freedom, of virtue, and of honour.”

Like most States that cling to a powerful centralized authority with a loose monetary policy, the Roman Empire was demolished from within.

Reading A History of Medieval Europe by R.H.C. Davis, you’ll discover sharp similarities between the final days of Rome and our current situation in America. One of the major reasons for Rome’s descent into calamity was its inefficient and unproductive economy.

In his book, Davis explains that since the “beginning of the fifth century the Roman Empire had been suffering from economic decline for at least two centuries.”  He also argues–and what could easily be read today in America– that “Rome had grown rich simply on the spoils of war.” The whole population consumed more than it produced. He went on to add that…

“Such an economy could have been maintained only by a policy of perpetual conquest and enlargement of the Empire. Once the frontier of the Empire was stabilized, the profits of war declined sharply, and the emperors had a struggle to raise enough money even to pay the army its wages. In such circumstances the easiest, and most disastrous, expedient was to debase the coin-age, and this the emperors did…Indeed, the most permanent feature of the later Roman Empire was that the purchasing-power of money was declining steadily, and that the decline continued not just for ten years or twenty but for centuries.”

We in the United States should be familiar with this historical scene. Since the creation of the central bank in 1913, the dollar has lost 96 percent of its value. Today’s dollar would be worth less than 4 cents a hundred years ago. The Federal Reserve was forged by powerful bankers in complete secrecy on Jekyll Island off the coast of Georgia. From that day forward, the elite bankers have controlled the destiny of America. What followed shortly after was the implementation of the income tax, the 1929 stock market crash, an 18 year great depression and two World Wars trailed by permanent war policies. And Nixon’s abandonment of the gold standard in 1971 finally gave the politicians and bankers free range on inflationary policies. That is why we had a phony housing boom. It’s also why a car costs more today than a house did 30 years ago. Inflation is theft on the general public.

America’s war addiction is another contributing factor to its decline. Today in the United States the price of war spending equals 94 percent of all income tax collected. This is good for defense contractors, but very bad for you and me. War is conducted to enrich the political class at the expense of the people. Unfortunately, under the banner of  ”War on Terror”, the pentagon can endlessly continue its immoral interventions overseas with little rebuttal from the obedient patriots of the U.S. And with the media’s help, the State will always have their consent.

What is the United States facing domestically?

Our economic system is chained to the boom and bust cycle created by the Fed. The Dow Jones is artificially inflated to give an appearance of a recovery. The housing market is being manipulated with the same tactics that caused the 2008 bust. The labor market has experienced over a decade of stagnant wages. Our economy is based mostly on debt and consumerism. The rise of taxes and inflation threatens our freedom and robs our savings. A great number of parasitical Americans live off the fruits of others. 47 million Americans are on food stamps. Poverty is soaring. And in the end, most citizens would rather be entertained instead of being informed. The byproduct of all this is going to have perilous costs on the world we know.

This is why our monetary system is dwindling down to its final days. The inevitable collapse of the Fed’s inflationary scheme will cause  great chaos among the people and they’ll be looking for someone to blame. Most will naively turn to the culprit–the state– for help, while the few that saw the writing on the wall will be marginalized.

The incredible collapse of Rome should be a historical reference guide to all Americans. It was the deluded and self-absorbed political elite, who drowned the people with bad debt, overextended the military, debased the currency and became morally corrupt with power–that killed the empire. The Barbarians that helped put an end to the Roman Empire are now knocking on the door of our troubled nation.

Will we go the way of Rome?

Or will we shed our skin to a new way of thinking?

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5 thoughts on “The Way of Rome?

  1. Since the creation of the central bank in 1913, the dollar has lost 96 percent of its value. Today’s dollar would be worth less than 4 cents a hundred years ago. The Federal Reserve was forged by powerful bankers in complete secrecy on Jekyll Island in South Carolina. From that day forward, the elite bankers have controlled the destiny of America. What followed shortly after was the implementation of the income tax, the 1929 stock market crash, an 18 year great depression and two World Wars trailed by permanent war policies.

    FWIW

    1. Jekyll Island is in Georgia
    2. The income tax was pushed by prohibitionists.Most of the tax revenue came from tax on alcohol. They had to find new tax revenue.
    3. The stock market crash and the resulting sustained depression were the result the progressive policies of Hoover and then FDR.
    4. The world is more peaceful today than in any period in human history.
    5. The United States has had a boom and bust cycle since its inception.

    1. 3. I agree with you completely–but these progressive policies we’re financed by the FED
      4. Though the world may be, generally speaking, at peace–the U.S is not. It has engaged in war for most of the 20th century. And, if this last decade is any indicator, we see no signs of a peaceful, non-interventionist foreign policy in the future.
      5. You’re right, the boom and bust cycle did happen before the Fed, but the bust were less severe and the recovery was a lot quicker before the central bank was formed. (7.7 months as opposed to the 10.6 months of the post-World War II)

      1. The United States role as world police would probably happen with or without the Fed. If the U.S. maintained more of a isolationist policy there would be a great deal of destabilization. Why the United States doesn’t levy a tax on nations like Japan/Korea/ for our military protection is beyond me.

        I’m not fond of the Federal Reserve either, but would you rather have people like Barney Frank determining monetary policy? Also, I’m not convinced the gold standard is necessary especially after reading some of the ludicrous things FDR did with it.

        At this point in history the Federal Reserve doesn’t have much of a choice other than printing more money. The government will not raise taxes or cut spending. Plus, the government helped contributed to the housing boom. The Federal Reserve isn’t without its problems, but it’s too often the scapegoat.

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